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Let's assume I find a company which defines itself "international" but is being traded in just one international stock exchange market.

  • The company does indeed work with international customers
  • The company is financially stable and even some kind of a "monopoly" in the state ("country") in which it was first registered

Is the fact that this company is being traded just in one stock exchange market a problem?

The better question may be, do companies that are being traded in two or more stock exchange markets, rather than in just one, generally or broadly safer for investment?

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https://www.coca-colacompany.com/faqs/what-is-the-coca-cola-company-ticker-symbol

Our stock is listed and traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol KO.

It would be easy to find other companies, but I think one of the most internationally recognized brands in the world is a sufficient example. International companies being traded on one exchange is the norm.

The better question may be, do companies that are being traded in two or more stock exchange markets, rather than in just one, generally or broadly safer for investment?

If you want a safe investment you simply invest in a broad index fund, there is no good evidence an average (or even savvy) investor can beat index funds in the long run. Trading individual stocks will always be what most people would classify as a "risky" endeavor no matter what criteria you apply.

edit: A perfect example is to look what were considered "blue chip" stocks in the past -- that is, stocks that help compose the DJIA and were considered to be broadly reflective of the health of the overall economy. Just over 20 years ago you would be looking Sears, just over 15 years ago you'd be talking about Kodak!

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