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Can I buy a car insurance for a used car I bought when I am a new student in the US without SSN and the US drive's license, but I have my home country's driver's license?

If so, does it cost more than usual for a car insurance in this situation?

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    Insurance rates are based on risk, and it's almost certain that auto insurance companies will see "new student in the US without SSN and the US drive's license, but I have my home country's driver's license" as HIGH RISK.
    – RonJohn
    Aug 7 at 23:59
  • Also, does the US recognize your country's driver's license as valid in the US?
    – RonJohn
    Aug 8 at 0:00
  • @RonJohn, I don't know, where can I find it? Aug 8 at 0:01
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    I Googled "what foreign driver's licenses are valid in the us" and found this: usa.gov/visitors-driving "People who drive in the U.S. must have a valid driver's license. If you're a foreign visitor, some states require you to have an International Driving Permit (IDP) and a valid license from your own country. To find out the ID requirements of the U.S. state(s) where you will be driving, contact that state's motor vehicle department." usa.gov/motor-vehicle-services
    – RonJohn
    Aug 8 at 0:49
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    Also from the visitors-driving web site: "Beware of international driver's license scams. Scammers may try to sell you a fake IDP. In addition to losing money, you may be subject to travel delays or legal issues if you use a fake IDP in the U.S."
    – RonJohn
    Aug 8 at 0:50
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Can I buy a car insurance for a used car I bought when I am a new student in the US without SSN and the US drive's license, but I have my home country's driver's license?

Yes

If so, does it cost more than usual for a car insurance in this situation?

Yes

Sorry for being blunt but I'm not sure what else there is to say about this. Keep in mind that many US states require your to get a US license quickly when you move there. It won't help with your insurance premiums though: they will still make you pay more so it's worth shopping around.

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It is important to remember that all US citizens, at some point, have not yet learned how to drive. Everybody in America, at some point, had no driving history for an insurance company to set premiums with. So, if you have no American license, you also have no U.S. driving history. They cannot tell whether you are the worst or best driver, so they will assume you are the worst.

It will definitely cost you more. In addition, if you could leave the country without paying your bills, you are also considered a higher risk since they also have to defend you in court and pay your attorney's fees in the event of an accident. If you leave, you cannot testify and they just lose. So, unless you lived here a long time, you would be considered a flight risk as well as a risk for having no American driving history.

Every state has laws for first-time drivers, it will totally depend on where you live.

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  • That's not true that insurance companies have no idea and assume the worst: there are correlated metrics. For American teens and college students, insurance companies can judge risk from school grades since it's a sign of responsibility, the "good student discount". This can be taken further by looking at the caliber of school you're enrolled in, via affinity group discounts (often marketed as an alumni association discount for current students). Another factor for new drivers is participation in formal driver training, which is the driver's ed discount.
    – user71659
    Sep 9 at 2:03

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