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I've researched the industry, I've read the financial statements, I've made my calculations, and I've finally bought the stock. Now what? From a fundamental analysis point of view, what do I need to do to stay up to date with the investment?

What I plan to do:

  • Read financial statements whenever they are published.
  • Keep up with company press releases — subscribe to the investors' mailing list and/or periodically check for new announcements on the investor relations website.
  • Check the stock's price regularly (e.g. twice a week) in order to not miss a good selling price.

Is there anything else I should be doing? I've heard about conference calls, but I don't know if those are of any use.

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Now what?

What's your plan, why did you buy the shares? I'm a fan of having an exit plan when opening a position even if that plan is just that I'm going to wait some number of years to revisit. There's a tricky balance you need to find between discipline and flexibility. You don't want to rigidly stick to a plan and ignore factors that change your outlook, nor do you want to abandon your plan at the slightest dip. Having some plan will help you determine how closely you want to monitor the position.

  • Read financial statements whenever they are published.
  • Keep up with company press releases — subscribe to the investors' mailing list and/or periodically check for new announcements on the investor relations website.

There's nothing wrong with doing these things, but odds are the price will be affected long before you read the financial statements/news. I'd just suggest being mindful of why you are paying close attention and how it fits into your plan. For example if you don't have any intention of selling for 5+ years, then maybe don't bother too much about quarterly earnings/analyst opinions.

  • Check the stock's price regularly (e.g. twice a week) in order to not miss a good selling price.

If you don't want to miss a good selling price then set up an order that will trigger a sale when your criteria for "good selling price" is met.

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  • What about earnings calls and reading news articles that mention the stock? Are those useful?
    – Flux
    Apr 21 at 15:39
  • @Flux It's all useful to some extent, my central thesis here is just that you can go overboard on information to a point that it isn't really helpful given your plan/reasons for taking the position in the first place. I have buy/hold stocks that I almost never check on (though I'd get an alert if they had a drastic change), I have others that I check daily because I'm playing them directionally and short-term, and a host that I check once a week. I know people that spend the bulk of every trading day looking at their positions, it feels unhealthy (and not useful) to me.
    – Hart CO
    Apr 21 at 16:06
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Subscribe to the stock ticker on various finance websites. For example, here's the Intel (INTC) page on Finviz. You can see if you scroll down that there are daily news items of interest to Intel shareholders, e.g. as of time of writing we have "Tony Zhang's Intel Trade Heading Into Earnings" and "The pandemic’s differing earnings effects will be on display with tech, airline reports". These news items will tell you the news, which you'll certainly want to stay up to date on.

You could also look at analysis other people have written on the stock. For example here's an article on Intel at Seeking Alpha published just yesterday. Websites such as Seeking Alpha also publish the conference calls that comes with earnings releases. For example here's a transcript from Intel's last earnings call, in January 2021. The conference calls are when management talks about their results, and analysts grill management on the company's direction. You will want to study what was said.

There's a veritable ton of information out there. Keeping up to date with everything is very time-consuming, which is why there are people who prefer to pay professional investors to do this full-time.

Best of luck with your investments.

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