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Some personal investment brokers like Vanguard are "backed" by Lloyds of London:

Assuming a fraudulent loss in a individual brokerage account:

  • Will they really replace the entire investment up to $49.5M ?
  • What exactly are these terms and conditions (and how easily will they change them) ?
  • Who are these "Syndicates" and why is it not just Lloyds ?
  • Any examples of how this played out in the past ?

To offer greater protection and security, Vanguard Marketing Corporation has secured additional coverage from Syndicates at Lloyd's of London for our brokerage clients. This additional insurance has the same customer eligibility requirements as SIPC. This coverage has an aggregate limit of $250 million for all claims of securities and cash and incorporates a per client coverage limit of $49.5 million for securities and $1.9 million for cash. This additional policy, provided by the Lloyd's of London Syndicates, is subject to its own terms and conditions. Coverage provided by SIPC and Lloyd's of London Syndicates does not protect against loss of market value of securities.

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(EDIT: This answer is based on the fundamentally different original question.)

Will they really replace the entire investment up to $250M ?

You snipped out the part that answers your question.

https://investor.vanguard.com/investing/account-protection "This coverage has an aggregate limit of $250 million for all claims of securities and cash and incorporates a per client coverage limit of $49.5 million for securities and $1.9 million for cash."

What exactly are these terms and conditions (and how easily will they change them) ?

Ask Vanguard.

Who are these "Syndicates" and why is it not just Lloyds ?

https://www.investopedia.com/terms/l/lloyds-london.asp

"Lloyd's of London is a British insurance market where members operate as syndicates to insure and spread out the risks of different businesses, organizations, and individuals. The syndicates are specialized in different types of risks and each syndicate decides which type of risk to insure. The main purpose of Lloyd's of London is to act as an intermediary between clients, underwriters, brokers, and insurance companies.

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  • Thanks, yes I missed the 49.5 for personal, however, the focus of the question in subject is about the principal of the promise, how likely is it, are there any examples of this in the past... Feb 20 at 1:50
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    @GregMcNulty you asked three equally prominent questions, and the first was about the $250M insurance. As I told my son many times, "I can't read your mind; all I know is what you say." That's why I answered all three.
    – RonJohn
    Feb 20 at 1:53
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    @GregMcNulty "how likely is it, are there any examples of this in the past". You absolutely did not ask that question.
    – RonJohn
    Feb 20 at 1:53
  • Fair and fair...will make intent more clear next time. Feb 20 at 1:55
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Will they really replace the entire investment up to $49.5M?

Probably not because there's an aggregate limit of $250mm. I suspect the way it works is people with assets in excess of the SIPC coverage could recoupe some sort of proportional loss up to the $250mm aggregate but never more than $49.5mm.

What exactly are these terms and conditions (and how easily will they change them) ?

Probably just ask Vanguard. In sure the contract has some in-force window after which contract terms can be changed.

Who are these "Syndicates" and why is it not just Lloyds ?

Because any time anything is "insured by Lloyd's of London" its actually spread out over multiple Lloyd's syndicates, that's how Lloyd's works. The certificate of coverage will illustrate what percentage of the risk is attributable to each syndicate. In the early days of the Lloyd's market the syndicates were wealthy individuals/families now many syndicates are large reinsurers.

Any examples of how this played out in the past?

Probably not. Lloyd's is a reasonably prominent excess insurer, providing additional coverage on top of some other existing coverage or covering more obscure risks. Lloyd's definitely covers risks and pays claims, I'm just not sure how many situations have ever existed where there was an SIPC covered event AND SIPC coverage was exhausted AND that broker had excess coverage. Maybe ask Vanguard. To that end I'm not sure how many dollars have ever been recovered by SIPC in the first place.

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