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let's say that 1 stock of XYZ currently is 50$.

I bought leap call option for XYZ with strike price 50$ and premium 10$. When exp date will come and I will exercise my call option. How much will I pay for single stock, if XYZ current price is already 100$?

Current price-strike price-premium. 100-50-10=40$

or

Current Price-premium? 100-50=40$?

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  • I think you mean exercising. – Voltage Spike Jan 31 at 7:16
  • Yeap typo ..... – Irakli Lekishvili Jan 31 at 7:21
  • just to be completely clear, fifty – Fattie Feb 1 at 13:34
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10$. When exp date will come and I will exercise my call option. How much will I pay for single stock, if XYZ current price is already 100$?

The current price is absolutely irrelevant - IF you exercise the option (which you can also do when it would result in a loss, i.e. the stock price trades lower than the strike - you get the stock option AT THE PRICE OF THE STRIKE. There is no bonus for a premium still there, the price is literally what it says on the option.

You will pay 50$ per share for a share, and the current value will be 100$.

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You usually don't keep the time value portion of the call. If you exercise it, it has to be 'in the money' and the shares will be transferred to your account by your broker at the strike price. So if the stock is trading at 100$ and the call was written for 50$ and you exercise it the stock will transfer to your account and either you or your broker will sell it if you want to profit. Or you could just keep the stock (but probably a good idea to sell it if your up 200%). So if you paid 10$ for the call you lose that. So you'd be up 40$ a share.

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  • Makes sense, thank you for your answer! – Irakli Lekishvili Jan 31 at 7:23
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    You keep the time value portion of the call if you sell it. You lose it if you exercise. There's no either you or your broker will sell it. You place a sell order and the broker forwards your order to the exchange/ECN where the transaction occurs if it is marketable. – Bob Baerker Jan 31 at 14:06
  • If you buy a call, on say, robinhood and you don't have a margin account, and you don't have enough cash to purchase the stock, your broker will sell the the stock or the option and won't deposit stock into your account. They'll give you the difference in cash. I have had this happen to me before. They'll either do that or they'll sell the option before it closes for cash if it's in the money and you can't afford the stock – Voltage Spike Feb 3 at 18:51
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A standard option contract (unadjusted) is for 100 shares not "1 stock".

When you exercise an option, the premium becomes irrelevant other than for determining your cost basis.

If the strike price of your call is $50 and the call costs $10, you will pay $50 per share for the stock and your net cost basis per share will be $40 ($50 - $10).

Note that unless you want to own the stock, it is usually better to sell the call to close, especially if there is time premium remaining.

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