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This year I am no longer able to access my account over my phone due the fact that my bank decided to drop (!!!) 2FA-class authorization, so verbalization of my personal information (!) is the only way I can access my account without an internet browser. Is there some legal or any other argument I can state to restore access to my account (US) over the phone?

  • For legal questions you could try law.stackexchange.com (but check their help first to see if this sort of question is on topic), or better yet, consult a lawyer. – glibdud Oct 28 at 1:43
  • Is this to regain access to the browser interface? or is this how you will have to do all transactions? – mhoran_psprep Oct 28 at 10:36
  • Have you considered to just switch to a different bank? – Philipp Oct 28 at 11:58
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    I’m voting to close this question because this is a legal question. – ChrisInEdmonton Oct 28 at 13:31
  • What do you mean by "verbalization"? That you actually have to say certain things? But I would think requiring that would violate the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), since some people are unable to speak. Regardless, I personally would switch banks. – jamesqf Oct 28 at 16:39
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Is there some legal argument I can state to restore access to my account (US)?

To give an answer,

i. No. Without even looking at it, there is 100.0000% certainty that the boilerplate adhesion contract you made when opening the account allows them to change/add/remove any apps or access methods at will.

Given (i), you fair and square started using a bank which stated in advance the app could disappear at any time, so, that's that.

However,

ii. Could there be a disability issue? i.e. customer is not able to access now due to a disability. In that case

(a) they will not change the whole app for you (as that costs millions),

(b) they will bend over backwards doing whatever it takes to avoid legal trouble from a disabled-rights group

(c) yes, in the USA, there is a non-zero chance you could actually bring a lawsuit (ie, a contingency ambulance chaser will do that for you) using the disability-2F angle; and/or if not a lawsuit, pressure from the relevant disabled-rights group.

Do note that a-b-c are only theoretical comments based on (ii).

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  • Makes sense. I thought since they had it before they at least had to notify on changes like this. But seems like theres no way to deal with it. – charlie137 Oct 28 at 15:33
  • Consumer rights now! – Fattie Oct 28 at 18:11

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