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I live in the US and I owe taxes to the state which I'm not able to pay. I don't have a permanent residence and live with family/friends. One of my family members received a letter stating their property will be seized, they don't have any financial affiliation with me. Is it possible for the state to seize someones property if I lived there - even though they have no financial affiliation with me?

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New answer based on comments

If someone else got a notice for your debt

Good news - this is illegal. It's also illegal to share debt information with a 3rd party. They cannot seize someone else's property to pay your debt. This sounds like a scam.

Having your name attached to a property you do not own sounds fishy.

The only legitimate reason I can think of for this is the owner owes taxes to the same organization and somehow they got the names confused. That's highly unlikely.

Did the letter have a court date? A name? Anything you can verify? Don't trust the letter. If it's officially from the state (which I doubt it is), then it'll be from a comptroller or some other office - with a name attached.

Google that name, and see what comes up. Do the address and phone number match? If they do, call the number from Google and arrange an in-person meeting.

You say you legitimately owe a debt. It's unlikely this is a real debt collector. Both a home address and debt could easily show up in a public records search. From there all the scammer has to do is pretend to be the debtee and abscond with the money.

ORIGINAL ANSWER:

The state (as in individual states) can and will seize property for back taxes, especially if it's in the state the taxes are owed. They can also garnish wages (i.e. they get your paycheck first and give you what is leftover), even if you are no longer in the state.

EDIT:

If you're renting/living somewhere and the house/property gets seized.

The state would do a normal eviction proceeding, so the owner would first get an eviction notice, then if they refused to vacate, the sheriff would come and throw everything in the house on the curb. Any personal property is still yours, but grab it before it goes to the curb.

  • I understand, however the property in question and it’s owner has no financial affiliation with me. My question was regarding the property of other individual. – Exocomp Aug 23 '20 at 19:00
  • He might have got this letter for his own debt that you don’t know about. – Aganju Aug 23 '20 at 22:45
  • @Aganju no that is not the case because it is my debt that I know for sure 100% no doubt – Exocomp Aug 23 '20 at 23:46
  • @sevensevens I'm not renting or living as in paying to live there. I do stay there off and on. So as you put in your edit it is a case where at their address they got a letter with my name and debt on it but it states the home at that address is to be seized. – Exocomp Aug 23 '20 at 23:48

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