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Why did my credit score drop from a 762 to a 689?

According to creditkarma I got hit with:

JPMCB-Card Service: Opening a new account can temporarily lower your score because it adds a hard inquiry to your report and lowers your average age of credit history. But with on-time payments and responsible use, your score may actually increase over time.

and

CBNA-New credit inquiry: Applying for a new line of credit will usually result in a hard inquiry on your credit report. You could also see inquiries from applications for a new apartment, phone or utilities account. Each hard inquiry will typically lower your score a bit, though the effects often wear off after a few months.

The combination of which took me from an excellent credit rating to a trash credit rating in one move? Why did this happen????

I applied for the Chase card (JPMCB), and was approved months ago.. why would they all of a sudden make an inquiry? Then, creating a new card with CITI (CBNA) resulted in a drop, but not with Chase? Should I be worried that CITI is also going to make an inquary, and drop my score by another 50 points?

Why would they even bother looking. I have gotten credit cards in the past, and they didn't bother to make these inquiry's. I just don't understand I have never missed a payment in my life. Will canceling these cards fix my credit score?

  • Is this the 2nd inquiry from JPM-Chase? They could have "approved" you months ago without a hard pull, but decided to do the pull now (for reasons only they know). – Nosjack Jun 9 at 20:00
  • No, no one has ever made a hard inquiry into my credit before them. They did it seemingly out of the blue despite me never missing a payment with them months after I was approved for the card. – Rob Jun 9 at 20:04
  • So you have other credit (not debit) cards and they never did a hard inquiry? Every credit card I have gotten required a hard pull, and my score is 750. – Nosjack Jun 9 at 20:09
  • I have a total of 3 cards, and none of them have pulled a hard inquiry according to credit karma until now. In fact, getting the cards was increasing my scores up until now. Like why would pulling a hard inquiry and getting a new card drop me by 73 points!!! That seems crazy to me. – Rob Jun 9 at 20:18
  • I need to know if I should cancel this CITI card before they pull a hard inquary into my account and drop my score by another 70 points... – Rob Jun 9 at 20:23
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First thing. Don't panic. The reason why you have a good credit score is so that when you need credit they approve it.

Check the dates to make sure that the application for newest credit card, and the creation of the other credit card match the dates you expect.

You mention two things:

  • JPMCB-Card Service: Opening a new account...

    That is a new card. That does several things. Your credit utilization goes down, which is good. The second thing that is does is decrease the average age of your accounts, which is bad. Both of these are expected. This isn't a hard pull. This is a change to your credit history file.

  • CBNA-New credit inquiry: Applying for a new line of credit...

    That is a new application. New applications always hurt your score. Again this is expected.

Over time both of these aspects will diminish. You score will go back what is normal for you. It might even get better.

What you experienced is why the advice is don't apply for a new card just before you need to apply for a car loan or mortgage. Doing so makes the lender very concerned. They see activity and they know it is recent and they wonder if you be able to afford the loan they were about to approve.

The fact your score went down is expected. Congratulations. Your great credit history allowed you to get two cards in the past few months.

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I applied for the Chase card (JPMCB), and was approved months ago.. why would they all of a sudden make an inquiry?

They didn't. The wording you cite for Chase states "opening a new account", not an inquiry. Inquiries happen when you apply, immediately; accounts take a month or two to show up, typically with your first statement. Your new Chase account has started reporting.

If you have a thin file (not many cards/loans), a new account will likely drop a key element of your score - the average age of accounts - significantly. You're focused on inquiries, but they're not the likely culprit here.

Cancelling the card will not improve things (as the new account will be on your report for years, even when closed). Time is the fix here. You've got two new cards; now's the time to let them age gracefully for 6-12 months.

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  • Side note: Your new Citi account will also hit your report soon. You may experience another dip from that. Do. Not. Panic. – ceejayoz Jun 10 at 0:09
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Do not cancel those cards

Let me explain

Applying for a credit card can hurt your credit score a little. According to FICO, a hard inquiry - when a card issuer pulls your credit after you apply - can lower your score. However, the impact is temporary. Hard pull stays on your credit report for two years, but their credit score effects wear off after one year.

A credit score impact of a single card application can be small, too many of them in a short amount of time can add up to a significant loss.

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Hard inquiries on your credit report aren't necessarily bad when they happen in moderation. After all, applying for a credit card it's a first great step in building credit.

Card issuers pull your credit report when you apply for new credit because they want to see how much of a risk you pose before lending you a line of credit. This credit check is called a hard inquiry and it temporarily lowers your credit score a few points.

These hard inquiries may remain on your credit report for 2 years, but FICO only considers inquiries from the last 12 months when calculating your credit score. Be sure to spread out your credit card applications over time. Only apply for a new credit card every 3 months, and maybe wait even longer between applications.

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