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So I like an idiot wanted to make money and fast so I picked a sugar mamma who I then gave access to my online banking. **After! Agreeing to an amount of 300$ ** she then told me she was going to need me to buy google play cards for her site supervisor. So she sent me 2500 and told me to keep 200$ for myself.. then sent me 1500$. So I called my bank telling them exactly what happened. And now my sugar mamma is threatening me with a lawyer for fraud.. apparently if it was her lawyer txted me with incorrect spelling as well! Saying if I do not go get what my sugar mamma wants he we be calling the Canadian police to tell them about the whole thing. But what does not make sense to me is that if she herself make a deposit on my account willing that I have in txt msg how is that me frauding her.

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    It's a scam, and their threats are meaningless. Just ignore them. If you can keep their $2500, great, but I am sure the deposit will show as invalid in a few days. – Pete B. Mar 9 at 12:44
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    It's a scam and the threats are meaningless, agreed. Don't attempt to keep the $2500 though because if you withdraw it, you will still be liable to return that amount when the deposit is cancelled. You've done the right thing in informing the bank - now just delete the scammers' messages, block them and move on. – Vicky Mar 9 at 12:53
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    To add to the other comments about the $2500 and any other money they put in: It could also be stolen from someone else. Telling you bank as much as you know and having them do what they do (hold the funds, reverse the funds, whatever) is the only play that will protect you from both insufficient funds when that money disappears and also from you being involved in a crime when the other party's (not the scammer) money gets traced to your account. Do not spend it and better don't just leave it there without telling the bank. – Damila Mar 9 at 15:03
  • I think this is the first time I've heard of a sugar mama :-) – jamesqf Mar 9 at 18:39
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Let's break this down:

who I then gave access to my online banking

Check the terms of use you agreed to when you signed up for online banking. They universally contain language saying "don't give your username and password to anyone, for any reason." If someone wants to give you money, there are many safe methods to do so. There is, quite literally, no good reason to give a stranger your online banking access. This in and of itself should be a red flag: if someone wants to give you money, they don't need access to your online banking.

she then told me she was going to need me to buy google play cards for her site supervisor

Ask yourself: Why can't this person buy the google play cards themselves? Any time someone asks you to do something once they've sent you money, that should be a red flag. They don't need you to do this. The reason why they're asking you to is that the gift cards are a way for them to launder money.

So she sent me 2500 and told me to keep 200$ for myself.. then sent me 1500$

A scammer sending you money and telling you to keep some of it, then do something with the rest is a red flag. They are using you to launder money. They are moving money through you as a way to hide the trail leading to them. The money they sent you is likely from another victim's stolen account - by sending you the money, getting you to buy gift cards, and then sending them the gift cards, they get access (by using the gift cards) to the money they're stealing from the other account, without any evidence pointing to them. This is a very dangerous position for you to put yourself in, even if you're willing to do dishonest things to earn the $200 you're allowed to keep. Once law enforcement discovers the other hacked account, they will trace it to you, and not only will the entire $4000 you've been sent disappear, but you will be held liable for the money laundering. Of course, once you explain what's happened, you will likely be seen as an innocent victim, and it's likely that no charges will be pressed - but you will be out the entire $4,000 amount (at best). At worst, this scammer is - right now - scamming someone else, and planning to make transactions pulling money out of your account to trick that person.

And now my sugar mamma is threatening me with a lawyer for fraud.. apparently if it was her lawyer txted me

There is no lawyer, the texts are coming from the same person (or someone else working with them.) The threats are designed to keep you quiet long enough that they can continue to take advantage of you. You can safely ignore the "lawyer." Scammers like to use shame, guilt, and threats to trick their victims, if there are any hints of the victim thinking they're being scammed. Don't believe anything the scammer tells you.

But what does not make sense to me is that if she herself make a deposit on my account willing that I have in txt msg how is that me frauding her.

It's not you frauding her. Scams don't have to make sense to be effective. In fact, scammers often do things that don't make sense on purpose in order to help them target the most gullible victims.

Ultimately, the mechanics of the scam don't matter. It's clear that you're being scammed. You mentioned that you have already contacted your bank. You should continue to stay in contact with them, and do what they tell you to do. Also, consider the following:

  • Change your online banking password immediately, if you haven't done so yet. If you used that same password anywhere else, change it on that site, too.
  • Pull your credit report and check for any unauthorized accounts. Continue to monitor your credit report for at least several years. Enroll in a monitoring service if you aren't already enrolled.
  • If the scammer gave you any specific instructions, and those instructions involved you doing any specific function or working with any specific financial institution, tell that financial institution immediately. Scammers like to exploit holes in banking practices at different institutions, if an institution knows they're being targeted in this way, they may consider changing their practices.
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