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So this girl messaged me last week just to talk or whatever, one thing lead to another and we started chatting on the phone. She “lives” 9 hours away from me and very very quickly developed a romantic interest - she’s a knock out too, completely out of my league so red flags are already going off.

A few things don’t check out with her online profile:

She has a text mail phone

Pics she sends me have some type of language that isn’t English (I can’t ever see the whole word but assume it’s German or similar).

So then she really lays it on and starts sending me LOTS of pics (some would make a sailor blush) and asks if I can send her a google play card for her bday - another red flag. I delay her and keep asking questions and she gets mad. So I blow up and tell her she’s a scammer.

We didn’t speak for a couple days, then she’s sorry, it’s really not that important. Also I forgot to mention her texts are broken English and she has a heavy Eurpoean accent.

Well now her mother is dying but she has an inheritance her father left her. But there are conditions such as she has to be married. So she has her lawyer email me to make sure I am interested in her (his English is even worse. Thank god I made up a fake email to use solely for that. You would laugh at the name!)and that he can transfer the funds to me.

So my question is why can’t she just collect the funds?

No they have to be sent to her “fiancé”. Well I’m not buying this and it’s felt fishy from the get go, but there's a weird part to me is she says she is coming here in two days so they can send the money.

Would a scammer really show up in your presence to do this? That’s bold.

Then we are both to go back to her home for a week to help her mother. I mean obviously I have no intention of letting someone put a half million dollars into my account but I have debated letting her show up under the impression it’s all a go just to see what she’s really about and to maybe give her a taste of her own medicine.

They are supposed to deposit a half million to me and she needs 15k for her mother’s surgery (no insurance? Ha). Is it a bad idea to let her come? Should I let it continue on up until the moment and then fold or just back out now?

No way I’m going through with it. Even if it is real I don’t want to take that chance but I don’t find it to be authentic. I don’t find her to be sincere (although it would be amazing if she was which I’m sure is why she does that scam) but every once in awhile something will sound right or seem like it’s legit.

It’s all very confusing as I’ve never been through this. I guess I know it is but maybe I don’t want it to be? Anyway, has anyone been through this or know anything about it? Before you ask, no I’m not a moron. I truly have no one to talk to about this (likely another reason I was targeted) or to hash it out with me.

I just got divorced too so I really don’t have much they could take but I do know the money deposited is likely illegal or something of the nature. How does this scam work?

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    And no one has asked for an account number or even said anything about how the transfer is to happen. Supposedly she went and signed paperwork today to make the withdrawal from her inheritance (there’s 7 mil more). Wouldn’t there be an easier way to pull this scam off or am I missing something? Makes me feel a bit naive but she’s really good. I even told her that when I blew up that she was good at her craft. – Matto Oct 23 '19 at 1:12
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    Whatever happened to meeting a normal person locally and falling in love ??? :->) Do yourself a favor and delete her profile. – Bob Baerker Oct 23 '19 at 1:23
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    Did that. Got the divorce, bought the tee, was loads of fun, cost me all I had and then some. lol. Unfortunately pretty much everything has gone online these days due to the nature of everyone’s busy lives. I was a bit curious if I shouldn’t let her come here and alert someone to it? I guess it wouldn’t do any good since a crime hasn’t been committed yet but she’s doing it to others too. – Matto Oct 23 '19 at 4:36
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is asking us to predict which scam script they are following, but that is not an answer we can know. – mhoran_psprep Oct 23 '19 at 10:11
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    While I think the below answers are pretty much 100% correct, for the sake of completeness, I think it's important to note that some times, someone really will show up at your house in a scam like this. It might even be a beautiful woman! But that doesn't suddenly make it not a scam. It's important to be skeptical even in the real world, not just online. Confidence scams didn't suddenly appear as a new thing once the internet existed, they've been around since the beginning of time. And in-person scams, by real people, are still rampant. – dwizum Oct 23 '19 at 12:40
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She (and bear in mind “she” doesn’t really exist, so might be better to think of as “he” with a team of accomplices at least one of whom is female if you’ve spoken to a woman in the phone) will not turn up. There will be some problem with flights or transport and “she” will send a “courier” to pick up the money from you, or ask you to wire it somewhere. A few days later the deposit in your account will turn out to be fake (a forged or stolen check, or taken from another mark’s account) and “she” will have $15k of clean money and you will have a $15k hole in your account at best, and at worst also be up on charges of money laundering and/or assisting a fraud.

Cut off contact, block “her” and move on. I’m sorry it’s not real, you sound like a good person, but you don’t need to be caught up in this.

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    Thank you for your response. I really do try to be a good person and I feel like that is who they enjoy preying in which is even more infuriating. I am let down it’s not real because it did seem enjoyable but I suppose that’s part of the whole process to get people hooked. I agree. I really don’t need this especially after how much I’ve already been through with my divorce. I believe you are correct and rather than risk anything to see the dramatic finale I opted to sever all ties. – Matto Oct 23 '19 at 17:09
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So then she really lays it on and starts sending me LOTS of pics (some would make a sailor blush)

That's the bait.

and asks if I can send her a google play card for her bday - another red flag.

They're testing your gullibility.

Well now her mother is dying but she has an inheritance her father left her. But there are conditions such as she has to be married.

Classic scam tactic.

I guess I know it is but maybe I don’t want it to be? I just got divorced too

Lonely person, looking for an emotional connection: the perfect scam target.

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    Thank you for your answer. That’s pretty much what I was expecting. I suppose I had hoped I was wrong. It’s nice to not feel lonely after being alone this long. Makes me their ideal target I suppose though. Thank you for your input. – Matto Oct 23 '19 at 17:15
  • @Matto after my first divorce, the loneliness was intense. I slept in the recliner because the bed was so... empty, and spent an embarrassing amount of money at bars and strip clubs. – RonJohn Oct 23 '19 at 19:07
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    @Vicky I disagree with your edit changing "man" to "person", since the "hot woman asking for money and marriage" scam is not aimed at other women. – RonJohn Oct 23 '19 at 19:35
  • it has been pretty brutal to put it mildly. Hence the “knowing it’s bogus but wishing it wasn’t” part. I’d rather be lonely than in jail though. – Matto Oct 23 '19 at 19:49
  • @RonJohn this specific instantiation of the scam might have been aimed at a man but there are just as many supposedly hot male scammers targeting vulnerable single women. – Vicky Oct 23 '19 at 19:54
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"How does this scam work?"

Well you've hit the nail on the head that it is a scam. Regardless of how much you want it to not be (and I do sympathise), you've pointed out all the red flags. This scam works by you paying $15k and thats the end of it.

"Is it a bad idea to let her come? Should I let it continue on up until the moment and then fold or just back out now?"

Yes it is, I suspect this person/group of people wouldn't show up in person but if they do then they have your address and could potentially harass you.

There is no half million dollar inheritence or gorgeous woman in this. Scams often try to make you doubt yourself by offering a large "prize" which makes you not want to believe the red flags.

  • You are correct. I did not consider they could try to do me bodily harm. She (or he) did ask for my address but I gave them a bogus one. I suppose I more or less wanted to lead them on in the way they had led me on. Similar to keeping a telemarketer on the phone for bothering you with no intent of buying. – Matto Oct 23 '19 at 17:11
  • @Matto And really there's no point in playing games with them - for instance, pretending that another suitor has shown up who also has an inheritance that is twice as big and that you've decided to go with them instead - because then you're still playing a game with them, and ultimately that is what they want, for you to keep playing the game (said the spider to the fly) – Michael Oct 23 '19 at 23:12
  • @Michael that is a valid point – Matto Oct 23 '19 at 23:29

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