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I used a website called Seeking Arrangements and met a sugar daddy. He asked for my email login, online banking login, routing, account number, Facebook, as well as my address which is the only thing I gave him since it’s a PO. I’ve been extremely vague just to see if this is real.

I don’t plan to give him anything because I have only been talking to him for a few months and I feel conflicted. I doubt that he is trying to scam me but I suspect that he has some kind of master plan. With things such as Venmo, Zelle, and Cashapp, what is the need for “put me on his payroll?”

He claims that he is in another country on a business trip. He said that he tried to send me a gift but he lost access to his card. He is now asking to deposit more than 10k into my account and have me wire it. Is this a l classic way of scamming people? If so, is it common that they spend months creating a relationship with you to catfish you?

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With things such as Venmo, zelle, cashapp what is the need for “putting me down in his payroll.”

If he were a real sugar daddy, then he'd do this to hide the payments from his wife.

He also claims that he is in another country on a business trip and lost access to his card because he tried to send me a gift

and is now asking to have his work deposit more than 10k into my account and have me wire it.

Are these all classic way of scamming?

Absolutely.

A legitimate businessman would have someone at his company contact his bank and send a new card to his hotel.

so, is it common that they try to catfish you and spend months creating a relationship with you?

He's working other women at the same time.

I’ve been extremely vague just to see if this is at all real, but I can’t seem to break through to him.

You want to believe, because you want a sugar daddy.

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  • Thank you for the quick response. If he knows my name and my PO address and phone number now what actions do you think I should take?
    – Madi
    Sep 12, 2019 at 16:10
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    Gifts are absolutely bait. A scammer's game is to win your confidence, so they can get you to do things. Talented scammers are very, very good at creating a sense of confidence in their marks. They know how to evaluate your personality and determine what your weaknesses are, and they know how to exploit you. Sending a few dozen roses to a PO box is nothing compared to the tens of thousands of dollars they may make by ripping you off once they have your confidence. Even if one out of a hundred or a thousand people fall for the scam, the cost of flowers is a drop in the bucket.
    – dwizum
    Sep 12, 2019 at 16:28
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    Why doe any guy send you flowers and gifts? To convince you that he loves you, and that you should trust him.
    – RonJohn
    Sep 12, 2019 at 16:29
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    @Madi In this case, I think sending you flowers wasn't a very large investment for him compared to potential payoffs. He was going to "deposit more than 10k into my account and have me wire it". It's practically guaranteed that he was going to "send" you the $10k, and then ask you to forward it somewhere. Then his $10k transfer would be reversed, (likely because it was stolen money, or a fake cheque) and you would now be down the $10k that you sent them. They will make sure the way that you send $10k is non-reversible, while they way they send you $10k can be reversed.
    – JMac
    Sep 12, 2019 at 17:05
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    @RonJohn: You must be a romantic :-) The flowers & gifts are almost always to persuade the woman to go to bed with him. If there's a "sugar daddy" arrangement that doesn't include going to bed with the guy (regularly!), then the odds are about 99.99% that it's a scam. Also if the guy puts the woman on the company payroll, he is (at least in the US) opening himself up for sexual harassment lawsuits and perhaps other legal problems.
    – jamesqf
    Sep 13, 2019 at 3:19

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