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So if stock x usually has zero volume, but there are sellers and the current market price of the stock is 50 cents and I buy 100 shares from a seller for 75 cents then will the market price go up to 75 cents?

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Noone knows.

The main issue is that you do not know how many OTHER sellers show up that are happy to get a LITTLE more than the current market price.

You may not even be able to pay 50% more than current market price - you FIRST have to buy all that is offered for a lower price. That is how exchanges work - you eat through the order book.

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    In other words, before you can buy a share for 75 cents, you would have to buy every share that anybody is willing to sell for less than 75 cents. But yes, if you managed to do that, you would raise the current price to 75 cents until somebody new was willing to sell a share for less than that. – David Schwartz May 21 at 21:30
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So if stock x usually has zero volume, but there are sellers and the current market price of the stock is 50 cents and I buy 100 shares from a seller for 75 cents then will the market price go up to 75 cents?

That depends on the numbers.

The current market price is the price on which the last order was processed. That doesn't necessarily mean much.

It depends on the number of asks there are present for a given price:

Say, there is one seller who sells 10 for 55 each and 10 for 60 each and another one (or the same one, that doesn't matter) sells 20 for 70 each.

If you place your bid now, you purchase all what is on the market described above, and the remaining 60 are placed as a bid at 75.

The market price in this scenario goes up to 70 cents, because that's what the last purchase was.

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