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Initially I worked for a company A. This company is owned by company B. A few years in, I transferred to company C, which is also owned by company B.

I started a 401(k) with company A, transferred to company C and started a 401(k) there. I have over 7 years total between the two companies and both of their vesting schedules state a full vesting period is 5 years.

Am I entitled to my full vesting on both 401(k)s now that I am cumulatively employed for over 5 years?

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    It seems that this could only be correctly answered by your HR department; but you might have a data point to observe: what actually happened to the contributions A made upon your transfer to C? – user662852 Apr 18 at 16:59
  • All the contributions that were made to company A 401K stayed intact. However, I am fighting that they fully vest as company C indicated that they would. Yes, I know, this should have come from the horses mouth so to speak. – user84546 Apr 18 at 18:26
  • Do your unvested matching contributions from company A still show on your statements? – stannius Apr 19 at 16:37
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Am I entitled to my full vesting on both 401(k)s now that I am cumulatively employed for over 5 years?

Most would agree that you are "entitled" to the money but there is nothing forcing your employer to honor that. The two companies are still distinct regardless of who owns them, but what you describe is certainly possible and has been done previously. If both 401(k)'s are at the same broker then it should be even easier for them to simply give you the full vesting in Company A's 401(k) and roll it over to Company C's.

A few years in, I transferred to company C

If your move was more of an in-company transfer instead of a "retire from A, hired by C" situation, then you should make sure to mention it. But again, it's up to your employer. If you have a contact with Company B that may also help.

See also the answers to this similar question (although it applies to someone at the beginning of the transfer process). If they won't give you the full vesting you can request some other type of compensation. Since you have already been working at Company C for a while they might not agree to it, but it doesn't hurt to ask.

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