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To preface I do know that gambling is generally a waste of both time and money, and as such I do not gamble. Sometimes though I do match betting.

For those that don't, know it is betting for an event to happen and not to happen on separate bookmakers websites in order to qualify for, and withdraw free bonuses that bookmakers offer to keep people playing/addicted. Outcome of the sporting event is irrelevant as the gain/loss is known at the moment bet and counter bet are placed. Great thing about it is that I do not need to know anything about any sport, just need to use comparison websites that find those bet/lay pairs.

Laying the bet (betting for something not to happen) does require sometimes a significant amount of money. I was considering using my credit card for that instantaneous liquidity that I need in order to milk the bonus rewards. I know that most credit providers classify using credit card for gambling as a cash advance, and as such interest will be charged from day one. I am ok with that caveat.

My only issue is whether this will negatively affect my credit score and any other future borrowing. For reference I got denied overdraft extension as the bank has seen outgoing money into many of these websites. There is a lot of money going back and forwards which may look like an unhealthy behaviour, even though long term there is only a constant profit.

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As long as you don't miss any payments on the credit card, it will not have any long-lasting effects other than increasing your credit utilization ratio. This is the amount of credit used as a percentage of all credit available to you, and counts for 30% of your credit score. Once you pay it off, this effect will go away.

I should say that it's not usually a good idea to invest with borrowed money. While matched betting, from what I can gather, seems like it can be low risk as long as it's done correctly, there's still the risk that something goes wrong unintentionally. I would thread carefully.

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  • Matched betting isn't necessarily risky. If done correctly/optimally, it can give a near perfect return rate. – aidan.plenert.macdonald Apr 4 '19 at 21:32
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    I'd add that it could affect the credit score if it leads to a high utilization. – 0xFEE1DEAD Apr 4 '19 at 21:44

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