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Some company signed me up for this credit card without my knowledge and now the account is showing in my Mint.com credit report and lowering the average age of my credit lines, and hence my score. I only authorized a credit check to see if I was qualified for the card and after seeing the interest rate, I declined to open the account.

Is there a way to close this and have it not show in my credit report in the future? I'm worried that "closing it in the wrong way" might show it as a legitimate, short-lived credit line that still affects my credit. I want it to be removed and to have no effect on my score.

Should I contact the resort/timeshare business that did this? Or some sort of fraud service?

Also, does paying off currently open credit lines remove them from the "Age of Credit" calculation?

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https://www.creditkarma.com/credit-cards/i/unauthorized-credit-inquiry/

This is similar to what you report.

Look in the fine print of the document(s) you signed. I'm betting they have some fine print allowing what they did. If not, a lawyer and some legal action could bring you some relief, since this might cross that line into fraud. If the fine print is there, the best you can do is close the account. You may be able to dispute it on your report (if so, go to all three bureaus). If it's not fraud, and the dispute process doesn't remove the account, it will at least annotate the account.

Also, don't allow a credit inquiry until you know the interest rate beforehand. The fact that they wouldn't show the rate is shady. Or if it's a posted rate "for well qualified borrowers", ask for a credit score range needed to get that rate. If you don't fall into the very top of the range, don't bother.

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    An unauthorized account is very different from an unauthorized credit inquiry. Also, your advice to never allow a credit inquiry until you know the rate is untenable -- the whole point of the inquiry is to get creditworthiness information which affects the rate. Your subsequent advice to check the score range to which the best rate applies is much more useful. – Ben Voigt Mar 15 at 16:42

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