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This question already has an answer here:

I know, I know; "Is this a scam?", yes, I had to ask.

As of recent, I have heard 3 separate people in conversation on my campus mention a "sales job" they undertook after being contacted on LinkedIn where they "manage accounts" by receiving checks from customers, and then wire the balance of that check to another account minus a 5% take they get to keep.

To me, obviously, this screams "money laundering"; they claim this is the only work they do, that it is legitimate because they are sent tax forms, and that it is legitimate because they have been paid. One of them claimed they've been involved with it for more than two months, and another attempted to smugly defend himself against two academic administrators who told him it was a poor idea.

I've never heard of these scams operating and finding victims through LinkedIn, so that is what makes me 1% skeptic that this is some sort of legitimate business, and I don't know the people I've talked to well enough to even know their name, so I'm unsure what to do about this.

How would I go about reporting this? I've never had any interaction with the scam myself, but I don't like the idea of this spreading to people I know if it is a large networked scam that is either stealing money from students or making them complicit in money laundering.

I don't believe this is a duplicate because apparently these students are given full account details, and it appears to be a large concerted effort to pose as a legitimate business through social media attempting to recruit "salespeople" who redirect transactions over long periods of time. From what I understand, students give their account details, possibly just a routing number, and redirect the transactions and get to keep a cut; the scammers pretend this is a commission, and apparently get them to pay taxes on it (maybe they don't want to go down like Al Capone).

marked as duplicate by Grade 'Eh' Bacon, JoeTaxpayer united-states Nov 10 '18 at 2:53

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    "I've never heard of these scams operating and finding victims through LinkedIn" The specifics like this never matter - if you get offered money for nothing, it is a scam. If you are transferring money between accounts as your 'job', it is a scam. Report this by contacting the individuals being scammed and immediately warning them. The link this is a duplicate of gives good reasons why. – Grade 'Eh' Bacon Nov 9 '18 at 20:16
  • @Grade'Eh'Bacon I don't believe this is a duplicate because apparently these students are given full account details, and it appears to be a large concerted effort to pose as a legitimate business through social media attempting to recruit "salespeople" who redirect transactions over long periods of time. – nostalgk Nov 9 '18 at 20:17
  • The linked question does provide good information though. I'm not reasonably able to contact these chance encountered people on campus again, unfortunately, and even if I did, they were very defensive about their scam being a legitimate internship opportunity for their major and argued in person with career counselors and other administrators. – nostalgk Nov 9 '18 at 20:18
  • It's not a scam. It has nothing to do with a scam. There is no connection to a scam. It is money laundering. They'll go directly to goal. Be well aware that ignorance is no excuse, and in this case it would be laughable to claim ignorance. – Fattie Nov 10 '18 at 5:07
  • I voted to re-open as OP is asking more "what to do about it" as in reporting it to law enforcement or campus policy enforcers whereas the apparent duplicate describes the functional operation of the scam. I'll suggest some edits to further steer the question in that direction. – Freiheit Nov 12 '18 at 16:48
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Yes, it's a scam.

Run a business, and you'll know that it takes work to generate revenue. It doesn't sound credible that any legitimate business owner would run their revenue through individuals who are strangers to them, and then pay them 5% of gross takings for the privilege.

Besides, if the stranger didn't report the revenue, would the business consider the customer's account to still be unpaid? That wouldn't encourage repeat business, to put it mildly. And if the stranger runs away with the money, the business is out of pocket. Even if they pursued legal action, it would be far, far simpler and more straightforward to just have the cheque deposited into the business's own bank account in the first place.

Since you say the scam was propagated through LinkedIn, consider their advice on how to deal with it:

If you've been the victim of a scam, report it to your local law enforcement. If you've received a scam message on LinkedIn, please contact us. - Recognizing and Reporting Scams, LinkedIn

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