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You can try a trailing stop limit order. There is a trigger price at which your sale will attempt to be executed; like any limit order, it will never execute below the trigger price. Rather than a fixed trigger price, though, your trigger price trails the current price by some amount you set. Say the current price is $50 and you set a trialtrail of $0.50. Initially, your trigger price is $50 - 0.50 = $49.50. If the stock price increases, the trigger price will increase so that it is never more than $0.50 less than the current price. The trigger price never decreases though; if the stock price hits the trigger price, the trailing limit order becomes an ordinary limit order, and your sale will execute at or above the now-fixed trigger price.

You can try a trailing stop limit order. There is a trigger price at which your sale will attempt to be executed; like any limit order, it will never execute below the trigger price. Rather than a fixed trigger price, though, your trigger price trails the current price by some amount you set. Say the current price is $50 and you set a trial of $0.50. Initially, your trigger price $50 - 0.50 = $49.50. If the stock price increases, the trigger will increase so that it is never more than $0.50 less than the current price. The trigger price never decreases though; if the stock price hits the trigger price, the trailing limit order becomes an ordinary limit order, and your sale will execute at or above the now-fixed trigger price.

You can try a trailing stop limit order. There is a trigger price at which your sale will attempt to be executed; like any limit order, it will never execute below the trigger price. Rather than a fixed trigger price, though, your trigger price trails the current price by some amount you set. Say the current price is $50 and you set a trail of $0.50. Initially, your trigger price is $50 - 0.50 = $49.50. If the stock price increases, the trigger price will increase so that it is never more than $0.50 less than the current price. The trigger price never decreases though; if the stock price hits the trigger price, the trailing limit order becomes an ordinary limit order, and your sale will execute at or above the now-fixed trigger price.

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You can try a trailing stop limit order. There is a trigger price at which your sale will attempt to be executed; like any limit order, it will never execute below the trigger price. Rather than a fixed trigger price, though, your trigger price trails the current price by some amount you set. Say the current price is $50 and you set a trial of $0.50. Initially, your trigger price $50 - 0.50 = $49.50. If the stock price increases, the trigger will increase so that it is never more than $0.50 less than the current price. The trigger price never decreases though; if the stock price hits the trigger price, the trailing limit order becomes an ordinary limit order, and your sale will execute at or above the now-fixed trigger price.