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The simplest answer is that you can convert the IRA to a Roth, and since it was already taxed, pay no tax on conversion.

If, in your hypothetical situation, you happen to have an IRA already in place, you are subject to pro-rata rules on conversions, e.g. your balance is total $40K, $10K 'not deducted', a conversion is 75% taxed, convert $20K and the tax is on $15K of that money. But, there also might be a time when you are able to transfer IRA money into a 401(k), effectively removing the pretax deposits, and leaving just post tax money for a free conversion.

The simplest answer is that you can convert the IRA to a Roth, and since it was already taxed, pay no tax on conversion.

The simplest answer is that you can convert the IRA to a Roth, and since it was already taxed, pay no tax on conversion.

If, in your hypothetical situation, you happen to have an IRA already in place, you are subject to pro-rata rules on conversions, e.g. your balance is total $40K, $10K 'not deducted', a conversion is 75% taxed, convert $20K and the tax is on $15K of that money. But, there also might be a time when you are able to transfer IRA money into a 401(k), effectively removing the pretax deposits, and leaving just post tax money for a free conversion.

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The simplest answer is that you can convert the IRA to a Roth, and since it was already taxed, pay no tax on conversion.