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Possible (unlikely) reasons:

  • You could pay in cash, but have limited amounts of cash, and better uses for it (e.g. emergency fund, unique investment opportunity).
  • You can get an exceptionally good financing deal where you're effectively paying no interest. This can occasionally happen when a dealership is strongly incentivized by their financing partner to sell loans, e.g. because some manager's bonus depends on hitting a number-of-sold-loans target. But of course, any proficient salesman will try to convince you that a perfectly normal full-rate loan is actually such a once-in-a-blue-moon special offer (see comment).

But usually, yeah, if you can pay cash, you should.

Possible (unlikely) reasons:

  • You could pay in cash, but have limited amounts of cash, and better uses for it (e.g. emergency fund, unique investment opportunity).
  • You can get an exceptionally good financing deal where you're effectively paying no interest. This can occasionally happen when a dealership is strongly incentivized by their financing partner to sell loans, e.g. because some manager's bonus depends on hitting a number-of-sold-loans target. But of course, any proficient salesman will try to convince you that a perfectly normal full-rate loan is actually such a once-in-a-blue-moon special offer.

But usually, yeah, if you can pay cash, you should.

Possible (unlikely) reasons:

  • You could pay in cash, but have limited amounts of cash, and better uses for it (e.g. emergency fund, unique investment opportunity).
  • You can get an exceptionally good financing deal where you're effectively paying no interest. This can occasionally happen when a dealership is strongly incentivized by their financing partner to sell loans, e.g. because some manager's bonus depends on hitting a number-of-sold-loans target. But of course, any proficient salesman will try to convince you that a perfectly normal full-rate loan is actually such a once-in-a-blue-moon special offer (see comment).

But usually, yeah, if you can pay cash, you should.

1
source | link

Possible (unlikely) reasons:

  • You could pay in cash, but have limited amounts of cash, and better uses for it (e.g. emergency fund, unique investment opportunity).
  • You can get an exceptionally good financing deal where you're effectively paying no interest. This can occasionally happen when a dealership is strongly incentivized by their financing partner to sell loans, e.g. because some manager's bonus depends on hitting a number-of-sold-loans target. But of course, any proficient salesman will try to convince you that a perfectly normal full-rate loan is actually such a once-in-a-blue-moon special offer.

But usually, yeah, if you can pay cash, you should.