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I want to make a note of something for other people that find this question and may have other purchases or cards in mind. With a card that is accepted everywhere (VISA, MC, Discover, etc) when you get a zero interest introductory offer for say... 18 months, you will not pay any interest for 18 months and then start paying interest on any remaining balance after that period. So, if you make a purchase for $2000 and pay $100 every month, you will end up paying interest on $200 after the 18 months.

Many store credit cards DO NOT work this way. For instance, let's say I go to Best Buy (not specifically picking on them, random example) and buy a fridge for $2500 and get "no payments and interest for 24 months" on my Best Buy store credit card. Then let's say I plan on making $100/month payment, but maybe I start making payments late or I forget one month or whatever. Well, interest starts to accrue on the entire $2500 and keeps getting calculated on the remaining balance every month. If you pay it off in the 24 months, that accrued interest goes away and you truly pay zero interest. However, if you go past that 24 month date by even a month, you pay the ENTIRE back-interest that has been accruing since day one (and it's a very high rate).

So, for store credit cards, always plan on paying off the purchase several months early, or use another way to pay that doesn't have such high risk.

As an example, I looked at the application page for a Home Depot store credit card. Applications usually have a lot of disclosures, so its a good place to find details like this and the Home Depot card always has this promotion. Sometimes it's extended to 12 or 24 months, but you always get the 6 month no interest "deal": PROMOTION TERMS: NO INTEREST IF PAID IN FULL WITHIN 6 MONTHS on purchases of $299 or more. Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within 6 months.

It sounds clear when it's singled out like this, but it's not as noticeable when you need a new washing machine and there are flyers and banners touting "NO INTEREST 18 MONTHS!".

I want to make a note of something for other people that find this question and may have other purchases or cards in mind. With a card that is accepted everywhere (VISA, MC, Discover, etc) when you get a zero interest introductory offer for say... 18 months, you will not pay any interest for 18 months and then start paying interest on any remaining balance after that period. So, if you make a purchase for $2000 and pay $100 every month, you will end up paying interest on $200 after the 18 months.

Many store credit cards DO NOT work this way. For instance, let's say I go to Best Buy (not specifically picking on them, random example) and buy a fridge for $2500 and get "no payments and interest for 24 months" on my Best Buy store credit card. Then let's say I plan on making $100/month payment, but maybe I start making payments late or I forget one month or whatever. Well, interest starts to accrue on the entire $2500 and keeps getting calculated on the remaining balance every month. If you pay it off in the 24 months, that accrued interest goes away and you truly pay zero interest. However, if you go past that 24 month date by even a month, you pay the ENTIRE back-interest that has been accruing since day one (and it's a very high rate).

So, for store credit cards, always plan on paying off the purchase several months early, or use another way to pay that doesn't have such high risk.

I want to make a note of something for other people that find this question and may have other purchases or cards in mind. With a card that is accepted everywhere (VISA, MC, Discover, etc) when you get a zero interest introductory offer for say... 18 months, you will not pay any interest for 18 months and then start paying interest on any remaining balance after that period. So, if you make a purchase for $2000 and pay $100 every month, you will end up paying interest on $200 after the 18 months.

Many store credit cards DO NOT work this way. For instance, let's say I go to Best Buy (not specifically picking on them, random example) and buy a fridge for $2500 and get "no payments and interest for 24 months" on my Best Buy store credit card. Then let's say I plan on making $100/month payment, but maybe I start making payments late or I forget one month or whatever. Well, interest starts to accrue on the entire $2500 and keeps getting calculated on the remaining balance every month. If you pay it off in the 24 months, that accrued interest goes away and you truly pay zero interest. However, if you go past that 24 month date by even a month, you pay the ENTIRE back-interest that has been accruing since day one (and it's a very high rate).

So, for store credit cards, always plan on paying off the purchase several months early, or use another way to pay that doesn't have such high risk.

As an example, I looked at the application page for a Home Depot store credit card. Applications usually have a lot of disclosures, so its a good place to find details like this and the Home Depot card always has this promotion. Sometimes it's extended to 12 or 24 months, but you always get the 6 month no interest "deal": PROMOTION TERMS: NO INTEREST IF PAID IN FULL WITHIN 6 MONTHS on purchases of $299 or more. Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within 6 months.

It sounds clear when it's singled out like this, but it's not as noticeable when you need a new washing machine and there are flyers and banners touting "NO INTEREST 18 MONTHS!".

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I want to make a note of something for other people that find this question and may have other purchases or cards in mind. With a card that is accepted everywhere (VISA, MC, Discover, etc) when you get a zero interest introductory offer for say... 18 months, you will not pay any interest for 18 months and then start paying interest on any remaining balance after that period. So, if you make a purchase for $2000 and pay $100 every month, you will end up paying interest on $200 after the 18 months.

Many store credit cards DO NOT work this way. For instance, letslet's say I go to Best Buy (not specifically picking on them, random example) and buy a fridge for $2500 and get "no payments and interest for 24 months" on my Best Buy store credit card. Then let's say I plan on making $100/month payment, but maybe I start making payments late or I forget one month or whatever. Well, interest starts to accrue on the entire $2500 and keeps getting calculated on the remaining balance every month. If you pay it off in the 24 months, that accrued interest goes away and you truly pay zero interest. However, if you go past that 24 month date by even a month, you pay the ENTIRE back-interest that has been accruing since day one (and itsit's a very high rate).

So, for store credit cards, always plan on paying off the purchase several months early, or use another way to pay that doesn't have such high risk.

I want to make a note of something for other people that find this question and may have other purchases or cards in mind. With a card that is accepted everywhere (VISA, MC, Discover, etc) when you get a zero interest introductory offer for say... 18 months, you will not pay any interest for 18 months and then start paying interest on any remaining balance after that period. So, if you make a purchase for $2000 and pay $100 every month, you will end up paying interest on $200 after the 18 months.

Many store credit cards DO NOT work this way. For instance, lets say I go to Best Buy (not specifically picking on them, random example) and buy a fridge for $2500 and get "no payments and interest for 24 months" on my Best Buy store credit card. Then let's say I plan on making $100/month payment, but maybe I start making payments late or I forget one month or whatever. Well, interest starts to accrue on the entire $2500 and keeps getting calculated on the remaining balance every month. If you pay it off in the 24 months, that accrued interest goes away and you truly pay zero interest. However, if you go past that 24 month date by even a month, you pay the ENTIRE back-interest that has been accruing since day one (and its a very high rate).

So, for store credit cards, always plan on paying off the purchase several months early, or use another way to pay that doesn't have such high risk.

I want to make a note of something for other people that find this question and may have other purchases or cards in mind. With a card that is accepted everywhere (VISA, MC, Discover, etc) when you get a zero interest introductory offer for say... 18 months, you will not pay any interest for 18 months and then start paying interest on any remaining balance after that period. So, if you make a purchase for $2000 and pay $100 every month, you will end up paying interest on $200 after the 18 months.

Many store credit cards DO NOT work this way. For instance, let's say I go to Best Buy (not specifically picking on them, random example) and buy a fridge for $2500 and get "no payments and interest for 24 months" on my Best Buy store credit card. Then let's say I plan on making $100/month payment, but maybe I start making payments late or I forget one month or whatever. Well, interest starts to accrue on the entire $2500 and keeps getting calculated on the remaining balance every month. If you pay it off in the 24 months, that accrued interest goes away and you truly pay zero interest. However, if you go past that 24 month date by even a month, you pay the ENTIRE back-interest that has been accruing since day one (and it's a very high rate).

So, for store credit cards, always plan on paying off the purchase several months early, or use another way to pay that doesn't have such high risk.

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I want to make a note of something for other people that find this question and may have other purchases or cards in mind. With a card that is accepted everywhere (VISA, MC, Discover, etc) when you get a zero interest introductory offer for say... 18 months, you will not pay any interest for 18 months and then start paying interest on any remaining balance after that period. So, if you make a purchase for $2000 and pay $100 every month, you will end up paying interest on $200 after the 18 months.

Many store credit cards DO NOT work this way. For instance, lets say I go to Best Buy (not specifically picking on them, random example) and buy a fridge for $2500 and get "no payments and interest for 24 months" on my Best Buy store credit card. Then let's say I plan on making $100/month payment, but maybe I start making payments late or I forget one month or whatever. Well, interest starts to accrue on the entire $2500 and keeps getting calculated on the remaining balance every month. If you pay it off in the 24 months, that accrued interest goes away and you truly pay zero interest. However, if you go past that 24 month date by even a month, you pay the ENTIRE back-interest that has been accruing since day one (and its a very high rate).

So, for store credit cards, always plan on paying off the purchase several months early, or use another way to pay that doesn't have such high risk.