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1

Charlie would have to have a family or employee-plus-one HSA-compatible plan to contribute the family limit ($6550 for 2014). Importantly, his wife cannot have non-HSA-compatible coverage. From the IRS: Other health coverage. You (and your spouse, if you have family coverage) generally cannot have any other health coverage that is not an HDHP. ...


1

I think you are asking yourself the right question about what tax bracket you will be in when you will retire. A couple of points to bear in mind. First have a look at a US tax table e.g https://turbotax.intuit.com/tax-tools/tax-tips/IRS-Tax-Return/2014-Federal-Tax-Rate-Schedules/INF12044.html The takeaway is that if you reduce your taxable income in any ...


0

There many asset allocation strategies to chose from that beat lifestyle funds. For example: Relative Strength Asset Allocation keeps your money in Stocks when stocks perform well, bonds when they outperform stocks, and cash when both bonds and stocks are under-performing. The re-allocation happens on a monthly basis.


3

Generally, to be able to write off worthless securities, you need to show that they're indeed worthless. It's not necessarily easy, as you need to prove that there's no way they will regain any value in the future. What is usually done, instead, is very simple: you sell them. Many brokers are aware of this problem and will assist by buying these securities ...


-1

Wyoming is a good state for this. It is inexpensive and annual compliance is minimal. Although Delaware has the best advertising campaign, so people know about it, the reality is that there are over 50 states/jurisdictions in the United States with their own competitive incorporation laws to attract investment (as well as their own legislative bodies that ...


0

1040 or 1040NR depends on whether you are a resident alien or nonresident alien -- 1040/1040A/1040EZ for resident aliens, and 1040NR/1040NR-EZ for nonresident aliens. Determining whether you are a resident is somewhat complex, and there is not enough information in your question to determine it. Publication 519 is the guide for taxes for aliens. (It hasn't ...


2

Both spouses need to file a W-4 with their employer. How they should be split is discussed on the form. The directions from the top of the form include this statement: Two earners or multiple jobs. If you have a working spouse or more than one job, figure the total number of allowances you are entitled to claim on all jobs using worksheets from only ...


0

First I'd call and make sure there's not some kind of mistake. If that fails, look into reapplying for forbearance. I'm not sure what you got it for before, but I added up your expenses (which you say is more than your income) and from your stated SL payments, it's more than 20% of your income. That should qualify you for a mandatory forbearance. If not, ...


1

I would even say 1% is not even reasonable in this age. The short answer is there probably isn't much you can do directly. However, there are a few things to consider: As Rocky mentioned get HR to change the plan. Worth a shot but is at best a longer term solution. Carefully read the 401(k) rules and talk to HR. Some 401(k) plans will have ways you can ...


1

Standard Repayment can be quite burdensome. Fortunately, it looks like FedLoan Servicing offers a variety of payment plan options, and even provides a calculator that you can use to compare them given your adjusted gross income and current loan balances. This won't reduce that $420 to $0 but it may bring it down significantly. I agree with @littleadv that ...


1

Would anything happen if you bring this issue to the attention of the HR department? Everyone in the company who participates in the 401(k) is affected, so you'd think they'd all be interested in switching to a another 401k provider that will make them more money.


13

It is very likely that the fund paid out a dividend in the form of reinvested shares. This happens with many funds, especially as we come to the end of the year. Here's a simplified example of how it works. Assume you invested $1000 and bought 100 units at $10/unit. Ignoring the daily price fluctuations, if the fund paid out a 20% dividend, you would get ...


23

You did something that you shouldn't have done; you bought a dividend. Most mutual fund companies have educational materials on their sites that recommend against making new investments in mutual funds in the last two months of the year because most mutual funds distribute their earnings (dividends, capital gains etc) to their shareholders in December, and ...


1

There are currently 3 states that do not recognize the HSA: Alabama, California, and New Jersey. (Until a couple of years ago, my home state of Wisconsin was on this list.) In those states, you can still have an HSA and deduct your contributions and HSA gains on your federal tax return, but when you do your state taxes, you need to add that income back in. ...


1

When you look at managed funds the expense ratios are always high. They have the expense of analyzing the market, deciding where to invest, and then tracking the new investments. The lowest expenses are with the passive investments. What you have noticed is exactly what you expect. Now if you want to invest in active funds that throw off dividends and ...


-2

You cannot register a LLC company in USA if you do not have a permanent address in USA and a social security number. If they allowed companies to be registered there without you having any presence in USA then any one would be able to do that and be not accountable for his/her actions using that company. Limited liability company is called that for a reason ...


-2

He can try opening a Schwab One International Account. It is designed for non-US residents and non citizens.


-1

Avoiding losses based on inside information is illegal. ...According to the SEC. A lot of things are illegal, according to the SEC. Kickback and relax, ok. Emphasis on kickback. No regulatory authority in the entire world prosecutes insider trading as aggressively the SEC (with the power of the Department of Justice) tries to. And the SEC fails to convince ...


6

Making any decision based on insider information is illegal. Whether the US Government will be able to prove these facts in court is a different question. That said, your post here may be brought in as the proof (and if you think you're anonymous here - think again).


2

If you break your lease and stop paying rent, you are still liable for any rent until the lease runs out or until someone else moves in, whichever is earlier. If you stop paying rent, then they can choose to sue you for the part you owe them. You are still entitled to your security deposit back, as long as there are no damages to the apartment (the deposit ...


4

In my opinion, the fee is criminal. There are ETFs available to the public that have expenses as low as .05%. The index fund VIIIX an institution level fund available to large 401(k) plans charges .02%. I'll pay a total of under 1% over the next 50 years, Consider that at retirement, the safe withdrawal rate has been thought to be 4%, and today this is ...


1

To the best of my knowledge, your immigration status is unknown to the credit reporting agencies, so changing from visa to green card or from green card to citizenship will have no effect whatsoever on your credit score.


4

To answer the question: What happens if you simply don't pay your rent is that they take you to court demanding what's owed them, and probably win. You did sign the lease promising you would pay it. WARNING: I am not a lawyer and do not know your local laws and codes and practices. The following is opinion based only on my personal experience and my best ...


6

According to the Virginia Residential Landlord and Tenant Act, section 55-248.35 (Remedy after termination) on page 37 says that if you terminate the contract, the landlord has the right to claim rent and a separate claim for actual damages for breach of the rental agreement. They can claim this until your lease is up or another tenant moves in, whichever ...


2

The one thing that I saw in here that raised a big red flag is that you said you "overpaid" on your interest. ALWAYS make sure you tell them that any extra money should be applied to principal only, not to interest. You accrue interest based on your outstanding principal amount, so getting that lower reduces the overall amount of interest you end up ...


1

Are there any (monthly) administrative fees on those loans that are charged separately? If not, you should just pay as much as you can as quick as you can to get the loan amount down on those loans with the highest interest rate. If there are no separate fees on the loans, then it's just a lump of money with some interest rate. The smaller loans will ...


2

Excellent question and it is a debate that is often raised. Mathematically you are probably best off using option #1. Any money that is above and beyond minimum payments earns a pretty high interest rate, about 6.82% in the form of saved interest payments. The problem is you are likely to get discouraged. Personal finance is a lot about behavior, and ...


5

It doesn't make a whole lot of sense to save up and wait to make a payment on any of these loans. Any dollar you pay today works better than saving it and waiting months to pay it, no matter which loan it will be applied to. Since your lender won't let you choose which loan your payment is being applied to, don't worry about it. Just make as big a payment ...


2

See if any of the funds they offer are index funds, which will generally have MUCH lower fees and which seem to perform as well as any of the actively managed funds in the same categories.


6

You might try to refinance some of those loans. It sounds like you are serious about minimizing interest expense, if you think you will be able to pay those loans in full within five years you might also try a loan that is fixed for five years before becoming variable. If you do not think you can repay the loans in full before that time, you should ...


7

It's definitely NOT a good idea to pay off one of the smaller loans in your case - a $4k payment split across all the loans would be better than repaying the 5% / $4k loan completely, as it's the most beneficial of your loans and thus is last priority for repayment. A payment that splits across all the loans equally is, in effect, a partial repayment on a ...


4

The presence of the 401K option means that your ability to contribute to an IRA will be limited, it doesn't matter if you contribute to the 401K or not. Unless your company allows you to roll over 401K money into an IRA while you are still an employee, your money in the 401K will remain there. Many 401K programs offer not just stock mutual funds, but bond ...


0

An additional reason is related to the schedule of reconstitution. Russell ranks all securities on the last trading day of May and assigns them into different indexes based upon market cap/style etc. Existing members of the index are also assessed to see if they are eligible to stay in the index, even though they may not strictly be within the exact market ...


-1

Since you were a nonresident alien student on F-1 visa then you will be considered engaged in a trade or business in the USA. You must file Form 1040NR. Here is the detailed instruction by IRS - http://www.irs.gov/Individuals/International-Taxpayers/Taxation-of-Nonresident-Aliens


3

It is really hard to tell where you should withdraw money from. So instead, I'll give you some pointers to make it easier for you to make the decision for yourself, while keeping the answer useful to others as well. I have 3 401ks, ... and some has post tax, non Roth money Why keeping 3 401ks? You can roll them over into an IRA or the one 401k which ...


1

You will have to pay your taxes in the UK not USA. For tax purposes it is the company's tax residency not where the server is located. You are just hiring a server in USA. Take for example a CDN being used for your same service then would you pay taxes in 300 different countries if you use Akamai? Does not work that way.


0

One other thing to consider, particularly with Vanguard, is the total dollar amount available. Vanguard has "Admiralty" shares of funds which offer lower expense ratios, around 15-20% lower, but require a fairly large investment in each fund (often 10k) to earn the discounted rate. It is a tradeoff between slightly lower expense ratios and possibly a ...


1

According to myfico, having an open credit card with an available balance will raise your credit score. This happens because if the card is paid off that will increase your overall available credit. However if you do not use your card then the issuer will most likely close the account automatically after usually about 1 year of inactivity. As long as they ...


3

I really like keshlam's answer. Your age is also a consideration. If you make your own target fund by matching the allocations of whatever Vanguard offers, I'd suggest re-balancing every year or every other year. But if you're just going to match the allocations of their target fund, you might as well just invest in the target fund itself. Most (not all, ...


1

It's a trade-off. The answer depends on your risk tolerance. Seeking higher rewards demands higher risk. If you want advice, I would recommend hiring an expert to design a plan which meets your needs. As a sample point, NOT necessarily right for anyone else...I'm considered an aggressive investor, and my own spread is still more conservative than many ...


0

Slice and Dice would have the approach for dividing things up into 25% of large/small and growth/value that is one way to go. Bogleheads also have more than a few splits ranging from 2 funds to nearly 10 funds on high end.


0

You are on the right track. As this seems more an accounting question than an actual tax question, I'll point out several points of discussion. Assume there is a property owned by a couple with one son. When one parent dies, s/he bequeaths one half interest in the property to the son and half to the spouse And Both parents owned the property ...


1

The information you need is given on page 2 of the form that you have linked to. You need to go through your paystubs for the year and calculate the total amount of Maryland income tax withheld up to the due date of the quarterly payment. In fact, most likely this information is listed on each paystub in an entry titled something like Y-T-D Maryland Income ...


0

As you've already mentioned - you'll have to pay taxes on the depreciation recapture. All the amounts you've depreciated will be taxed at 25%. Any gains left over that will be taxed as capital gains. In addition, if you have disallowed passive losses related to that condo (and that condo only) - you can deduct them from the gains. The gains (and the ...


0

Alright, team! I found answers to part 1) and part 2) that I've quote below, but still need help with 3). The facts in the article below seem to point to the ability for the LLC to contribute profit sharing of up to 25% of the wages it paid SE tax on. What part of the SE tax is that? I assume the spirit of the law is to only allow the 25% on the ...


0

In addition to the family taking a loan, YOU may be able to take out a loan either through the college or independently, and pay it off over the next decade or so... presuming that your wages after graduation will be high enough to cover that cost. I have no idea whether that option is available for students from other countries. You can also find a job and ...


3

Buying a starter home is not a bad idea if you have a stable job and plan to stay in the area for a long time. Owning a house that you can afford is a very good idea. Purchasing a home that you do not want to live in long term is not a good idea. People who move frequently pay a lot in real estate commissions, as you've mentioned, but they also pay loan ...


3

No. You are "covered by a plan at work" if you were covered for any part of the year, even if for one day. (In fact, there are people who stopped working at a job that offered a plan in the December of the previous year, but since they got paid on the 1st of the month, their last paycheck was in January, they were considered to have been covered, even if ...


0

Your question implies that you are 70-1/2, and not employed by this company. (Note - if you remain employed, the mandatory distribution is delayed) The best thing to do is to open an IRA and transfer the 401(k) to it. You then have all the investing choices you can ask for including low risk gov securities, right up to high risk leveraged ETFs (don't buy ...


2

For some reason this can result in either the flow through income being UNTAXED or the flow through income being taxed as a capital gains. Either way this allows a lower tax rate for LLC profits. I'm not sure that correct. I know it has something to do with capital accounts. This is incorrect. As to capital accounts - these are accounts ...



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